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Frank Badur

About Drawing: Frank Badur: In Conversation with Wynn Kramarsky & Rachel Nackman

January 9, 2014 - Wynn Kramarsky & Rachel Nackman

Frank Badur: The process of making a drawing begins with an impulse. Very often my drawings stem from my interest in architecture or in nature. I may also be thinking about music, Asian philosophy, or Asian poetry. But—and this is important—my work is never narrative; those sources provide only the impulse to start my drawings.

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Art In America: The Hard-Edge Sign

April 1, 2013 - Stephen Westfall

Badur produces richly colored compositions of austere, rectangular forms and softer grids, while Miller creates optically vibrant grids of hundreds of floating, precisely sized and spaced diagonal dashes. Such rigor is also found with Roeth, who, in multi panel paintings, builds up layers of tempera pigment with intense, devotional care.

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Art=Text=Art: Kathleen McEvily on Frank Badur

November 30, 2010 - Kathleen McEvily

My drawings start where the spoken word fails and where language breaks down in the attempt to formulate and express my specific perceptions and sensibilities. (Badur, 2007)

A postcard from an artist, sent in the mail, arrives at the office of a friend. Instead of writing a message, the artist – being an artist – has composed a drawing. This drawing is a series of lines in a pattern. Start with a red line drawn with a ruler. Follow with a freehand line drawn with a pencil. Then another freehand line, this time drawn in blue. Next, another freehand line drawn in pencil. Conclude as started, with a red line made with a ruler. Repeat four times. At the top of the drawing, the artist writes the date, Aug 30, 2005, and the salutation, Dear Wynn. Below the drawn lines, the artist closes with his name, Frank. This small, playful postcard drawing is balanced and symmetrical in its control and repetition.

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The Brooklyn Rail: Letter from BERLIN: FRANK BADUR, Why Pattern?

December 11, 2009 - David Rhodes

Frank Badur has been part of the Berlin scene from the time he studied here, between 1963 and 1969. He became a professor at the University of Art in 1985, and, like many other German artists who maintain successful international careers, he has continued to teach. This has resulted in a certain continuity in German art, which makes it less subject to the vagaries of fashion that affect places like London so damagingly. 

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