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Freddy Chandra

SF Gate: Bay Area visual arts picks, Jan. 30-Feb. 2

January 29, 2014 - Kenneth Baker

Freddy Chandra: Tuning In: This Bay Area sculptor, who often works with light, presents wall-bound abstractions in cast acrylic. Tightly clustered vertically or horizontally, their color bars vary in transparency and finish, and in length and thickness. They change subtly with the viewer's position and with time of day. Some of them can act like wind chimes for the eye.

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Visual Discrepencies: A Reflection of the Synthetic

August 9, 2011 - Brent Hallard

Brent Hallard: I think we live in a funny color world: I mean the hills and trees, they are green, rust, brown, hay, and they are soothing. The bay, well that has every personality under the sun, and the moon... and I think of your work, and I think of the light that is much less in the hills and more in the bay, while also a refection of the synthetic.


Freddy Chandra: For me the color of things becomes more poignant when its perceptual presence asserts some kind of independence from its source. Bluish dusk framed by a window... or driving in the rain with water drops obscuring as you look out the window at the glowing red light: these are all recognized. But how do these things translate from recognition to sensational experiences? Being awash in blue, red, violet, or any other colors: even if only in the space of the mind. I often have a hard time answering questions about the use of color in my work. The process itself is intuitive, maybe to the point where the colors in a specific piece become a given, as if there was no other choice. And maybe it’s always a reflection of the synthetic, as in everything has to be synthesized to start with.

 

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Shotgun Review: Listening Sequence

October 1, 2009 - Mary Anne Kluth

Listening Sequence,” Freddy Chandra’s solo debut at Brian Gross Fine Art, is a synethesthetic meditation built on Minimalist forms, and evoking multivalent layers of sound. Manipulating the clarity and tonality of deceptively simple blocks on the wall, Chandra composes delicate rhythms of shadow, color, and empty air.

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